Research Clinics Semester 2, 2015-2016

Vakbeschrijving Research Clinics Semester 2, 2015-2016
Collegejaar: 2015-2016
Studiegidsnummer:
Docent(en):
  • Dr. P.F. Hudson
Voertaal: Engels
Blackboard: Ja
EC: 5
Niveau: 200
Periode: Semester 1 & 2, Blok III, IV
  • Geen Keuzevak
  • Geen Contractonderwijs
  • Geen Exchange
  • Geen Study Abroad
  • Geen Avondonderwijs
  • Geen A-la-Carte en Aanschuifonderwijs
  • Geen Honours Class

Tags

See below.

Admissions requirements

  • Academic Writing (or equivalent)
  • Other requirements may be in place for specific research projects.
  • Second or third year students only

Like for any other course, students cannot enroll for the research clinics more than once.

Description

This course introduces students to academic research by engaging them in ongoing research projects of LUC staff members. Students are invited to participate within various stages of a project, ranging from the set-up or the application for research grants, over the gathering of data and the drafting of findings, to the final polishing of a text and preparing it for publication.

Registration

If you are interested in one of the clinics below, please submit a brief motivation (~150-200 words) before 4 January to course.administration@luc.leidenuniv.nl. We hope to be able to inform students about their application by 22 January.

Projects

Earth, Energy and Sustainability (EES)

  • Another yet Overlooked Socio-Agricultural Revolution: Early to High Middle Ages Agricultural and Technological Transformation (Dr. Peter Houben). Key words: case study, human-nature interactions, land use, energy conversion, human ecosystem colonization, Middle Ages, history, social ecology. Prerequisites: Interest in social ecology, using HANNP-based sociometabolic energy flux as an efficiency indicator; read literature, partially conducting own literature search for archival sources, may require to read German or French sources describing land use pattern. Perhaps helpful (but not necessarily part of research clinic): basic GIS skills to map and quantitatively compare two historical modes of land use applying he concept of (Human Appropriated) Net Primary Production.
  • Comparing Available Hydropower Resources across Two Conditions of Natural and Medieval, Human-Engineered Floodplain Environments (Dr. Peter Houben). Key words: case study, human-nature interactions, Middle Ages, engineering, medieval high-tech industries, energy production. Prerequisites: may include to read French sources, basic GIS skills (helpful but not a prerequisite) to calculate hydropower availability for two different stages of historical floodplain evolution.
  • Taking Stock of Recent Soil Loss and Soil Sealing (Dr. Peter Houben). Key words: case study, mapping growth of settlements and developments for a specific area (e.g., in the NL). Prerequisites: skills in searching for and working with spatial data, basic GIS skills for data evaluation and visualization of results.
  • Global Governance Reform Initiative: Oceans Governance (Dr. Joris Larik). This research clinic aims to actively involve students in a policy-oriented research project on Oceans Governance carried out together with The Hague Institute for Global Justice, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands and the Observer Research Foundation (New Delhi). Up to three students, 2nd or 3rd years.
  • The Global Challenges Storybook is looking for 2-3 writers per global challenge who would want to tell stories illustrating how global Challenges affect normal people. This Research Clinic will train students to illustrate important themes through compelling narratives.

Global Public Health (GPH)

  • Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Colorectal Cancer Risk (Dr. Jessica Kiefte-de Jong. Prerequisite: Quantitative Research Methods. One student.
  • Exploring Food Affordability and Health-related Quality of Life in The Hague: A Pilot study in Bezuidenhout-West (Dr. Jessica Kiefte-de Jong). Prerequisite: speaking Dutch. Two students working together.
  • Creating Shared Space for a Better Future through an Inter-Generational Dialogue: Interaction between the Students Emergency Action for Liberal Democracy (SEALDS) and Japan’s Postwar Intellectual Thinkers and Their Thought in Post-3/11 Disaster Japan (Dr. Maja Vodopivec). Pre-requisites: None. Reading Japanese is desirable but not necessary.
  • The Global Challenges Storybook is looking for 2-3 writers per global challenge who would want to tell stories illustrating how global Challenges affect normal people. This Research Clinic will train students to illustrate important themes through compelling narratives.

Governance, Economics and Development (GED)

  • Immigration Policy Dynamics: Charting the State-of-The-Art (Dr. Brandon Zicha and Ms. Diana Branduse).
  • The Constitutional Implications for Policy Dynamics of Veto Player Theory and Dynamic Veto Player Theory (Dr. Brandon Zicha).
  • Traditional Authority in a (Post)Modern World: Refining and Validating an Original Global Dataset and Analyzing Interesting Cases (Dr. David Ehrhardt).
  • Citizenship and Inequality in Nigeria: Case Studies and Original Survey Data Analysis (Dr. David Ehrhardt).
  • Targeting Civilians: State and Paramilitary Violence in Civil War (Dr. Anar Ahmadov).
  • Is the “Resource Curse” Intractable? (Dr. Anar Ahmadov). Additional prerequisite: The Political Economy of Natural Resources.
  • The Global Challenges Storybook is looking for 2-3 writers per global challenge who would want to tell stories illustrating how global Challenges affect normal people. This Research Clinic will train students to illustrate important themes through compelling narratives.

Human Diversity (HD)

  • Faking It: Political Deception in Early Modern Art and Culture (Dr. Jacqueline Hylkema). Apart from Academic Writing, there are no specific prerequisites for this clinic although having done Dr. Hylkema’s Academic Writing sections courses and/or her Hogarth workshop would come in handy as these all include an introduction to political iconography.
  • Walls, Borders and Boundaries in Contemporary Europe and Beyond (Dr. Daniela Vicherat Mattar). Prerequisites: Academic Writing or equivalent, 2nd or 3rd years students.
  • Creating Shared Space for a Better Future through an Inter-Generational Dialogue: Interaction between the Students Emergency Action for Liberal Democracy (SEALDS) and Japan’s Postwar Intellectual Thinkers and Their Thought in Post-3/11 Disaster Japan (Dr. Maja Vodopivec). Pre-requisites: None. Reading Japanese is desirable but not necessary.
  • The Global Challenges Storybook is looking for 2-3 writers per global challenge who would want to tell stories illustrating how global Challenges affect normal people. This Research Clinic will train students to illustrate important themes through compelling narratives.

International Justice (IJ)

  • Insight into Human Trafficking (Dr. Alexis Aronowitz).
  • Global Governance Reform Initiative: Oceans Governance (Dr. Joris Larik). This research clinic aims to actively involve students in a policy-oriented research project on Oceans Governance carried out together with The Hague Institute for Global Justice, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands and the Observer Research Foundation (New Delhi). Up to three students, 2nd or 3rd years.
  • The Global Challenges Storybook is looking for 2-3 writers per global challenge who would want to tell stories illustrating how global Challenges affect normal people. This Research Clinic will train students to illustrate important themes through compelling narratives.

World Politics (WP)

  • Faking It: Political Deception in Early Modern Art and Culture (Dr. Jacqueline Hylkema). Apart from Academic Writing, there are no specific prerequisites for this clinic although having done Dr. Hylkema’s -Academic Writing_ sections courses and/or her Hogarth workshop would come in handy as these all include an introduction to political iconography.
  • US State funded research project titled Rehabilitation of Violent Extremist Offenders in Prison (Liesbeth van der Heide). We look at rehabilitation programs worldwide (large N), followed by a number of case studies (for a structured comparison) to find out what the underlying assumptions are in these programs and to what extent these assumptions match the scientific literature on de-radicalisation and disengagement.
  • Global Governance Reform Initiative: Oceans Governance (Dr. Joris Larik). This research clinic aims to actively involve students in a policy-oriented research project on Oceans Governance carried out together with The Hague Institute for Global Justice, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands and the Observer Research Foundation (New Delhi). Up to three students, 2nd or 3rd years.
  • Creating Shared Space for a Better Future through an Inter-Generational Dialogue: Interaction between the Students Emergency Action for Liberal Democracy (SEALDS) and Japan’s Postwar Intellectual Thinkers and Their Thought in Post-3/11 Disaster Japan (Dr. Maja Vodopivec). Pre-requisites: None. Reading Japanese is desirable but not necessary.
  • The Global Challenges Storybook is looking for 2-3 writers per global challenge who would want to tell stories illustrating how global Challenges affect normal people. This Research Clinic will train students to illustrate important themes through compelling narratives.

Course objectives

After having successfully completed this course, students will have be proficient in one or more of the following course objectives to be able to :

  • formulate research questions and structure a collective project;
  • draft and revise an academic text of high quality;
  • utilize specific research skills and methodologies in the context of a larger research question,
  • cooperate in a research team.

As such, this course provides excellent preparation for students’ Capstone projects as well as later academic research at graduate or post-graduate level.

Timetable

N/A

Mode of instruction

Each student is expected to meet with her/his project leader regularly to discuss her/his progress, receive feedback on earlier work, ask questions and outline further assignments.

Individual project leaders may require additional meetings during which students can be asked to give presentations to all project participants. Project leaders may also ask students to attend specialist lectures, seminars or conferences – insofar as relevant for the project.

Important: students are expected to keep a log of their activities, detailing per hour spent on the project what they have accomplished.

Assessment

Participation during research clinic meetings, 10%, Block 3 + Block 4;
Weekly assignments, 60%, Block 3 + Block 4;
Keeping a research log, 10%, Block 3 + Block 4;
Research report, 20%, Block 3 + Block 4;

Note that all assignments as well as the final grade for the clinic will be stated as Pass/Fail.

Blackboard

N/A

Reading list

Relevant readings differ per project – this will be indicated by the project leaders during the first week of the course.

Registration

This course is open to LUC students and LUC exchange students. Registration is coordinated by the Curriculum Coordinator. Interested non-LUC students should contact course.administration@luc.leidenuniv.nl.

Contact

Dr. Paul Hudson (p.f.hudson@luc.leidenuniv.nl)

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