International Relations: Global Order in Historical Perspective, 2017-2018

The one-year Master of Arts in International Relations, specialisation Global Order in Historical Perspective offered by the Faculty of Humanities of Leiden University, focusses on the processes behind the evolution of the global order. Aside from this you will gain insights in the pursuit of global justice and the variety of ethics, ideologies, institutions and norms that underpin the international political system.

The programme (60 EC total – 30 EC per semester) consists of a Core Course Global Order in Historical Perspective and two general core courses (Ideas in World Politics and Regionalism in World Politics) as well as a combined thesis seminar and methods course and a thesis. The remaining 20 EC (10 EC per semester) can be acquired by choosing two electives (max.20 students per elective): one elective has to be chosen from the field of Global Order in Historical Perspective, the other elective can be picked from the complete list of electives that are offered for the MA International Relations.

Please note that there may be additional entry requirements for electives that are offered by other departments, and that the number of places available for Global Order in Historical Perspective students might be limited. Also make sure you read the details under ‘more info’ for more detailed information about the curriculum and your options.

All students except graduates from the Leiden BA in International Studies and graduates from the LUC The Hague Liberal Arts and Sciences BA with a major in World Politics or Human Diversity have to apply for admission, see mastersinleiden.

All students of the February 2017, September 2017, and February 2018 intakes please refer to the more info tab for a full overview of the curriculum.

Courses

More Info

Objectives
Structure
Master thesis and requirements for graduation
Specialisations
Contact information

Objectives

The programme has the following objectives:

  1. to enable students to acquire academic knowledge, understanding and skills, and train them in the use of scientific methods in the field of International Relations;
  2. to enable students to develop the following academic and professional skills:


    • independent academic reasoning and conduct,
    • the ability to analyse complex problems,
    • academic writing;
  3. to prepare students for an academic career and further education;
  4. to prepare students for a career outside academia.

Structure

Students wishing to replace one elective (10 EC) with an external course or internship, please contact the Co-ordinator of Studies to discuss your options. Other courses can't be replaced. If you wish to receive an exemption for one or more courses based on similar previously completed courses on Master level, please contact the Co-ordinator of Studies.

September 2017 semester for students who started in February 2017 (with the specialisation International Studies):

  • Choose one of the four Core Course specialisations (10 EC)
  • Regionalism in World Politics (5 EC)
  • Thesis (15 EC)

September 2017 semester for students starting in September 2017:

  • Core Course Global Order in the Modern Era (10 EC)
  • Ideas in World Politics (5 EC)
  • Thesis Seminar and Methods in IR Research (5 EC)
  • Elective (10 EC) - students must choose one elective within their specialisation and can choose one elective from the complete list of electives on offer for the MA International Relations.

February 2018 semester for students starting in September 2017:

  • Regionalism in World Politics (5 EC)
  • Elective (10 EC) - students must choose one elective within their specialisation and can choose one elective from the complete list of electives on offer for the MA International Relations.
  • Thesis (15 EC)

February 2018 semester for students starting in February 2018:

  • Core Course Global Order in the Modern Era (10 EC)
  • Ideas in World Politics (5 EC)
  • Thesis Seminar and Methods in IR Research (5 EC)
  • Elective (10 EC) - students must choose one elective within their specialisation and can choose one elective from the complete list of electives on offer for the MA International Relations.

September 2018 semester for students starting in February 2018:

  • Regionalism in World Politics (5 EC)
  • Elective (10 EC) - students must choose one elective within their specialisation and can choose one elective from the complete list of electives on offer for the MA International Relations.
  • Thesis (15 EC)

Master thesis and requirements for graduation

A thesis is an academic essay, written by the student in consultation with a supervisor. The thesis must show that the student is capable of analyzing existing literature in a critical manner, and of conducting independent research. Moreover, this process must be recorded in an academically sound report.

Generally speaking, students are encouraged to select the topic of their thesis themselves, based on a Master’s course that they followed. In most cases, the first supervisor of the thesis will be the lecturer responsible for the Master’s course which inspired the thesis. In case of doubt, students can always consult other supervisors within the Humanities Faculty.

During the first semester, students will complete the 5 EC course Thesis Seminar and Methods in International Relations Research in which they will choose a topic for their thesis, formulate a research question, and submit a research proposal and literature review. Students who have not fulfilled the requirements of this course or have not received the approval of the Examinations Committee will not have their MA thesis supervised.

The thesis for the MA International Relations is a maximum of 15.000 words including notes, bibliography and appendices. The thesis is supervised by a lecturer in the Humanities Faculty, who possesses expertise in the relevant field. The thesis is judged by two lecturers involved in the program.

In assessing the quality of the thesis, the following aspects play an important role:

  • Formulating and analyzing the research question;
  • Structure of the thesis;
  • Integration of primary and secondary literature into the argument;
  • Argumentation skills;
  • Style, use of language and lay-out;
  • Independent and original research

Graduates of the programme have attained the following learning outcomes, listed according to the Dublin descriptors:

  1. Knowledge and understanding
    a. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of

- the contemporary and historical dimension, the evolution and interdependency of bilateral and multilateral relations among states and non-state actors,
- the importance of government institutions and frameworks for the development of these relations,
b. and the main areas and issues of current global and regional politics and international relations. knowledge of the main academic terminology, theories and paradigms pertaining to the past, present and future of current global issues and politics, with a special focus on ideas and approaches related to the humanities.

  1. Applying knowledge and understanding
    a. the ability to locate, analyse and critically assess primary documents emanating from relevant sources and secondary (academic) sources, relating to areas and issues relevant to International Relations, including the process of European integration;
    b. the ability to conduct independent multi-disciplinary research and to formulate and conduct substantial pieces of academic research (including a master’s thesis) in the field of International Relations, thereby showing the ability to comprehend and apply relevant theoretical insights and methodological approaches;
    c. with regard to major regional and global areas and issues, the ability to successfully transfer and apply research to non-academic settings and environments;
    d. the ability to initiate and conduct research into the relevant areas and issues of regional and global politics, economics and culture;
    e. the ability to follow and understand the evolution of academic and non-academic discussions on the complex interdependency of national, regional and global politics;
    f. the ability to apply and evaluate qualitative and, if applicable, quantitative methods to the relevant contexts.

  2. Judgement
    a. the ability to independently and critically evaluate evidence and sources relating to the variety and interdependency of areas and issues of regional and global economics, politics and culture;
    b. the ability to evaluate the historical, political, economic and cultural factors that shape the interests and behaviour of major state and non-state actors in the contemporary world, including the European Union;
    c. the ability to recognise, reflect upon and judge between different academic opinions and arguments on the complexity and interrelationship of contemporary politics, cultures and economics.

  3. Communication
    a. the ability to clearly and convincingly present academically-supported arguments and analyses with respect to the evolution of relations among states, international organisations and non-state actors before peer-group and professional audiences both orally and in writing;
    b. the ability to present research in the relevant areas and issues.

  4. Learning skills
    a. the learning abilities required to be able to follow post-master’s professional training or a PhD training of a largely self-determined or autonomous nature.
    In addition to the above programme-wide achievement levels, graduates will have obtained the following achievement levels per specialisation:

Specialisation in Global Order in Historical Perspective

  1. Knowledge and understanding
    a. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the processes behind the evolution of the global order, the pursuit of global justice and the variety of ethics, ideologies, institutions and norms that underpin the international political system;
    b. Knowledge and engagement with different trajectories of states, organizations and peoples, examining how they are manifested in power relations and interact at different points across time to order the world;
    c. Knowledge of how power relations are structured, from the great power politics of global governance, to diplomatic culture in regional and national perspectives through regional and transnational groupings.

  2. Applying knowledge and understanding
    a. The ability to critically analyse primary sources relating to institutions, nation-states, transnational organisations and NGOs;
    b. The ability to apply a solid historical knowledge to current affairs and international politics.

  3. Judgement
    a. The ability to critically evaluate evidence on issues relating to global order;
    b. The ability to dissect how institutions and systems of power are created modified and evolve over time;
    c. The ability to review and assess different opinions and discourses about the system of global governance.

Specialisations

Global Order in Historical Perspective is one of the specialisations of the Master International Relations.

The Master International Relations has five specialisations:

  • Culture and Politics
  • European Union Studies
  • Global Conflict in the Modern Era
  • Global Order in Historical Perspective
  • Global Political Economy

Contact information

For more information, please contact the Co-ordinator of Studies.

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